Archive for November, 2010


Try these seven low-cost ways to boost small-business sales.

(from Entrepreneur Magazine) 

Small changes to your marketing mix can have a big impact — especially if you tap the wealth of low-cost tools available to you online.

Here are seven small marketing changes that you can make now to boost your sales in 2011:

1. Put a Twitter link in your e-mail signature. By including a link to your Twitter page at the bottom of the signature file in your e-mail messages, you can spread the word about your business every time you hit the Send button. “I use Twitter religiously to promote my company and my clients,” says Stacy Kelly, CEO of Mobile Previews LLC, a New York City company that promotes movies and other products by creating engaging experiences that consumers can access on their mobile phones. “I also link to it to help build up my list of followers. The cost is nothing but a little thought power.”

2. Turn the back of your business card into a promo. Can’t afford to advertise in print or broadcast? The back of your business card is advertising real estate that you own, and, best of all, it’s free. By featuring a photo of yourself, a picture of your product, a 10 percent off coupon, or a list of services that your company provides, you can turn your business card into a powerful marketing tool. “That extra info can be a great conversation starter,” says John Fletcher, president of Johnny Agency Inc., a New York City graphic design firm that creates marketing materials for growing businesses. “It also allows you to convey important facts about your business during those precious moments when you have someone’s attention.”

3. Revamp your website. If you’ve already spent the money to build a website, it may be time for a facelift. Rather than spending big dollars to redesign your home page, try creating a series of low-cost “landing pages” to test different ads and offers for your products and services. “Your website is not a brochure,” says New York City consultant David Ronick, co-founder of Upstart Bootcamp, an online school for startups. “Most people today come in through the back door and through blog posts.” Be sure that your site is easy to read — not only for people browsing the web through their computers but accessing your site through their iPhones and BlackBerrys, too.

4. Position yourself as an expert. There’s nothing that builds your brand faster than free advice. Whether you’re a landscaper, a handbag designer or a dog walker, your expertise will have customers knocking at your door offering to pay you to help solve their problems. “The key is to give away thought leadership to build an audience,” Ronick says. Once you find out what works, go out there and replicate it.” One of Ronick’s clients, a luxury outsourced concierge service, regularly tweets about hot, new restaurants, clubs and bars, generating new leads from prospects who need the company’s service.

5. Swap lists with sites that have similar demographics. There’s no reason to pay big money to rent a mailing list when you can get sites that attract a similar audience to let you borrow theirs for free. Ronick says that one of his clients, a site that publishes a newsletter about women in finance, used this technique to build a list of 50,000 subscribers. “They did lots of trades that didn’t cost them anything out of pocket,” he says. “The key is to create great content and give it away for free on the web.” Be careful to respect the privacy of the subscribers whose e-mail addresses are on the lists you swap, or you may get labeled a spammer by your ISP. To avoid trouble, ask the site whose list you’re borrowing to handle the mailing itself and to include a link to your site that their subscribers can click to sign up for your newsletter.

6. Get a vanity phone number. Just because the phone company stuck you with a random number when you signed up for their service doesn’t mean that you’re saddled with it for life. Torya Blanchard, a former French teacher who opened Good Girls Go To Paris Crepes LLC in Detroit two years ago, was looking for ways to bring customers in the door when she found Ring Ring LLC, a company that provides small businesses with vanity phone numbers. Blanchard picked 1-877-PARISCREPES, and her phone has been ringing off the hook every since. “I’ll never give up that number,” she says. “That’s how people know us.” The cost: approximately $25 a month, says Aaron Beals, Ring Ring’s CEO.

7. Test, measure and test again. Just because you’ve found a marketing strategy that seems to be working doesn’t mean that you should blow your entire budget on, say, business cards or vanity phone numbers. Test, measure and test again before rolling out your campaign. Google Analytics will measure your traffic for free and tell you where your site visitors are coming from and which search terms they’re using to find you. “Test every piece of your marketing campaign,” Ronick says. “Once you’ve found the right formula, follow it.”

The bottom line: You don’t need to have a big marketing budget to make a big splash. A tweak here, a tweak there, and soon your phone will be buzzing with new business.

Advertisements

An article by American Expess discusses ways in which some companies have leveraged social media to boost their business. To view the original article, click here.

Unlike any technology before it, social media lets marketers engage directly with customers and prospective customers. That’s important because when companies get close enough to build relationships, sales rise.

“You look at companies that are killing it on Twitter. They’re killing it because they’re connecting on a personal basis,” says social-media marketing consultant Paul Gillin, who has written three books on the topic.

Consider Ford Motor Co., which Gillin cites as one of Corporate America’s top users of social media for marketing. Last year, Ford gave 100 social-media savvy influencers new Fiesta compacts to test drive for six months. Their tweets and blog posts about the experience led 125,000 prospective buyers to register their names with the automaker.

Those kinds of results explain why marketers at companies of all sizes have embraced social media. In 2009, 43 percent of the Inc. 500 rated social media as “very important” to their marketing strategy, up from just 26 percent in 2007, according to a study from the Center for Marketing Research at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

Mid-size companies are using social media to connect with consumers whose buying habits are changing. “People are literally bypassing the home pages of corporations. They are bypassing the flyers in the mail and the television commercials, and they’re going to social media,” says Derick Schaefer, whose Dallas-based firm, Orangecast, manages social-media marketing campaigns for roughly 30 clients.

Many of Schaefer’s clients invest in social-media marketing to build their brands, and with good reason. In a March 2010 study, researcher Chadwick Martin Bailey (CMB) found that consumers who follow brands on Twitter and Facebook were more likely to buy after engaging with them in the social sphere.

While some marketers invest in social marketing to find leads, others use it to build community and still others to manage a crisis, all with impressive results.

Blogging for leads

Before the advent of social media, companies spent their marketing dollars buying lists, surveys and advertising campaigns to generate leads. Today, marketers are taking that money and pouring it into social media.

In Rick Short’s case, that means paying for blogs. Short is marketing communications director at Indium, a mid-size maker of electronic components in Utica, New York. In lieu of other marketing, Short uses a web-based program to create keyword-based blogs the company uses to generate leads. In all, Indium runs 73 blogs organized around keywords and phrases that pertain to its business, including words such as “heat spring” and “solder paste.” Maintaining 73 blogs is easier than it sounds. Thirty Indium engineers and other employees create the content, but blog software from a vendor called Compendium Blogware automatically repurposes a single post to any of the company’s blogs where the material is relevant. To capture leads, each blog runs with the employee-blogger’s contact information, allowing prospective customers to leave a comment, a question, and if all goes well, their email address.

“People are literally bypassing the home pages of corporations. They are bypassing the flyers in the mail and the television commercials, and they’re going to social media.”

Derick Schaefer, managing director, OrangecastThe company’s blogging strategy has paid off. Since adopting Compendium’s blogging software in the second quarter of 2009, Indium has seen its opt-in contacts rise 600 percent. “Most people would be happy with a 10 percent, or a 20 percent or a 50 percent increase,” Short says.

Linking up a community

Other companies rely on social media to cultivate online communities where participants could eventually turn into customers.

That’s the case at uTest, a Southborough, Massachusetts, company that gets paid to match professional testers with clients that have websites and software that need testing. Without a large enough community of testers, uTest wouldn’t have a business. To build that community, the two-year-old company uses a company blog, Twitter, a Facebook page and a LinkedIn group. The company has also created its own community-building tools, including a web-based app called “Meet the Testers.”

According to Matt Johnston, uTest’s vice president of marketing and community, creating all those groups helps the company build credibility by starting discussions that interest testers. “We do that because it’s one of the best ways to engage people in our community,” he says.

So far, so good. A total of 30,000 testers have joined uTest’s various social networks, and in 2009 its community building tools received a “Commendation of Excellence” award from the Society for New Communications Research.

uTest also advertises on social networks to prospect for companies that might need its services. On LinkedIn, uTest presents ads to members whose demographics suggest they have something to test, and therefore a need for uTest’s services. As a result, Johnston has been able to generate 1,000 leads from a single campaign for half of what he expected to spend.

Disaster recovery

Some companies use social-media marketing to get out of sticky situations, or prevent them from happening in the first place.

Boingo Wireless is one of them. On April 10, the Los Angeles WiFi company’s email marketing system malfunctioned and erroneously notified thousands of customers they were no longer eligible for unlimited wireless service.

Within minutes, Boingo PR and social media manager Baochi Nguyen’s iPhone and Nexus One smartphones buzzed with the epileptic frenzy of thousands of angry tweets forwarded from the company’s Twitter feed.

Boingo was quick to act. Within five hours of getting the first complaint, CEO Dave Hagan posted an apology on the front page of the company’s website. Nguyen followed with her own contrite blog post, resulting in kudos from customers and observers. Nguyen then spent the rest of Saturday through Monday morning answering 700 tweets, emails and Facebook posts, reassuring customers they’d been exposed to a bogus message.

The day of the malfunction, it was by luck that Nguyen was monitoring the company’s Twitter feed, since Boingo had no formal social media monitoring system.

They got one fast enough afterward though. Today, under the company’s new policy, during business hours Nguyen and a fellow Boingo employee respond to any customer tweet within 30 minutes. The extra vigilance has paid off. Since the email malfunction, the number of people following the company’s social media accounts – on Facebook and Twitter particularly – has risen 50 percent, Nguyen says.

“By and large they were really understanding,” Nguyen says. “After the apology, it was so amazing to see the folks that came forward to support Boingo.”

Gillin, the author and social-media marketing consultant, gives Boingo credit for acting fast. But he also credits the channels, arguing that social media’s ability to engage immediately and authentically sets it apart. Top marketers recognize this, and they’re mixing and matching services to meet customers where they are, instead of waiting for them to show up at their virtual doorstep.

Indium’s Short agrees. “The content that we publish in our blogs today is an answer,” he says. “Tomorrow, somebody’s going to type in the question.”

An interesting report prepared by GlobalSpec looks at the future of Business-to-Business marketing. Several key points in the report are the following:

1. The economy is improving and manufacturers are responding with
increased marketing spend.
70% of companies expect sales to increase in 2010 over 2009 levels, a strong indicator that the  economy as a whole and the industrial sector in particular are improving. Only 7% anticipate sales to be down in 2009. In response to improving conditions, manufacturers are increasing their marketing  investments.

31% are reporting an increase in their marketing budgets in 2010.

2. Manufacturers are investing more marketing resources online.
Manufacturers now realize that the vast majority of their target audience goes  online in search of suppliers, products and services—and in response are increasing online marketing investments in 2010 to connect with this audience.

47% of manufacturers will spend more than one-third of their 2010 marketing budget online; 27% will spend more than half of their marketing budget online.

The majority of manufacturers (51%) are increasing the online portion of their marketing budget over last year and 68% are increasing spending in online social media channels. In addition, online marketing channels occupy the top six areas where companies will be increasing marketing spending over 2009.

Conversely, spending on traditional media channels will be down: 25% are decreasing trade magazine advertising and 24% are decreasing use of printed directories.
3. Quality of leads delivered ranked most important when allocating marketing
budgets.
When asked to rate the importance of various factors in allocating marketing budgets, marketers ranked lead quality most important—8.6 on a scale of one to ten—with fit of audience exposure and reach of audience exposure placing second and third.

Quantity of leads and quantity of clicks to a company Web site placed a distant eighth and ninth,  respectively, out of nine factors. In terms of generating leads, three of the four top sources are online: company Web sites, e-mail marketing and search engine optimization.

4. Industrial marketers face the same challenges year after year.
For the past three years, marketers have listed the same three marketing challenges at the top of their  list: too few marketing resources, not enough high quality leads and a need to improve ROI. While most manufacturers are shifting resources to online marketing, the transition is not happening fast enough or broad enough.

Despite online marketing’s proven ability to deliver high quality leads, 48% of respondents still said they are not generating enough high quality leads for their sales teams. And although online programs deliver easily measurable results, 34% stated they need to improve their marketing ROI. It’s true that 47% of marketers are spending more than one-third of their marketing budget online, but that means 53% are spending less than one-third online. These manufacturers are behind and should increase their online marketing investments to help achieve their goals and overcome their marketing challenges.

Other Highlights of the survey responses include:

• 70% of companies anticipate an increase in sales compared to 2009.

• Marketing budgets are recovering after a down year in 2009, with 31% reporting an increase in their marketing budget this year.

• 74% stated that customer acquisition or lead generation is their primary marketing goal. These have been the top two marketing goals for the past three years.

• The top three marketing challenges in 2010 are having too few resources, not enough quality leads and a need to improve marketing ROI.

• Three of the top four sources of leads are online channels, including the company Web site, e-mail marketing and search engine optimization.

• 68% of companies plan to increase spending on social media in 2010. LinkedIn and Facebook are the most popular social media applications currently being used.

• 47% will spend more than one-third of their marketing budget online, and the majority (51%) will invest more in online marketing in 2010 than they did in 2009.

Will try to delve further into the report in the near future.

The producer price index (PPI) for finished goods increased 0.6% in October, not seasonally adjusted (0.4%, seasonally adjusted), and 4.3% since October 2009, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported on Tuesday. The PPI for inputs to construction industries, a weighted average of all materials used in construction plus items consumed by contractors (such as diesel fuel), rose 0.6% for the month, not seasonally adjusted, and 4.8% over 12-months. But prices charged by contractors for finished buildings and by subcontractors remained nearly flat, meaning they were having to absorb materials cost increases. Specifically, the PPI for new office construction fell 0.1% for the month and 0.4% over 12 months; industrial buildings, 0.2% and 0; warehouses, 0.5% and 0.2%; and schools, 0.3% and 1.2%. The PPI for nonresidential building work by roofing contractors rose 0.2% for the month but fell 2.6% year-over-year; concrete contractors, -0.3% and 0.2%; electrical, 1.0% and 0.6%; and plumbing, -0.4% and 1.6%. The materials price increases were driven by spikes in the PPIs for diesel fuel, 7.2% and 20%; copper and brass mill shapes, 5.4% and 15%; steel mill products, 1.4% and 12%; and aluminum mill shapes, 1.8% and 10%. Prices moderated or fell for plastic construction products, 0.7% and 2.0%; concrete products, 0 and -0.4%; gypsum products, -0.2% and 0; asphalt paving mixtures and blocks, -0.5% and 4.8%; and lumber and plywood, -0.9% and 6.7%.

   Several price increases for construction inputs have occurred or been announced since the PPI data were collected in mid-October. Crude-oil and copper futures moved to two-year highs last week before retreating in the past four days. The national average retail price of highway diesel fuel jumped this week to $3.18 per gallon, up 39 cents (14%) from a year ago, the Energy Information Administration reported on Monday. Several wallboard manufacturers announced price increases to take effect in December. But American Gypsum said it would not increase prices until March, and weak demand for building construction makes a December increase appear dubious. Similarly, one concrete supplier in Texas announced a $7-per-yard price increase for January 1 but it is not clear competitors or market conditions will sustain the change. On November 8 and 9, the leading makers of reinforcing bar products announced price increases of $20 per ton, effective on December 1.

   Nonfarm payroll employment increased by 151,000, seasonally adjusted, in October, including a 10th consecutive monthly increase in private-sector employment, BLS reported on November 5. Construction employment rose 5,000 in October and estimates were adjusted up by 3,000 for August and 16,000 September, but employment remained 122,000 (2.1%) below the year-earlier level and 2.1 million (27%) below the August 2006 peak. Of the five BLS construction employment categories, only heavy and civil engineering construction gained jobs over the past 12 months: 4,800 (3.5%). Nonresidential building contractors shed 12,200 (1.7%); nonresidential specialty trade contractors, 58,700 (2.8%); residential specialty trades, 51,900 (3.3%); and residential building, 28,500 (4.7%). Architectural and engineering services employment, a harbinger of future demand for construction, was flat for the month and down 14,300 (1.1%) over 12 months. These year-over-year declines were generally milder than in the past two and a half years. The unemployment rate for construction workers in October was 17.3%, not seasonally adjusted, down from 18.7% a year ago but higher than any other industry and nearly double the rate for all workers. Average hourly earnings in construction were $25.26 in October, seasonally adjusted, up just 0.7% from October 2009.

   Construction spending totaled $802 billion in September at a seasonally adjusted annual rate, up 0.5% from the downwardly revised August estimate of $797 billion but down 10% from September 2009, the Census Bureau reported on November 1. Public construction spending climbed 1.3% for the month and year. Of the two major public components, highway and street construction spending slipped 0.1% in September and edged up 0.4% over 12 months, whereas educational construction spending rose 1.6% for the month and fell 4.8% over the year. Private nonresidential spending fell 1.6% and 25%, with double-digit percentage decreases in the eight largest categories. In descending current size, the largest private types were power, -0.9% for the month and -22% over 12 months; commercial (retail, wholesale and farm), -2.6% and -21%; manufacturing, -4.8% and -37%; and health care, 0.7% and -13%. Private residential spending rebounded 1.8% in September after three months of steep declines but was down 6.3% year-over-year. Of the three types of residential spending, improvements to existing single- and multi-family construction jumped 6.2% for the month but dropped 4.6% year-over-year; new single-family, -2.6% and -0.1%; and new multi-family, 3.3% and -44%.

   Mixed indicators of future construction spending appeared this week. The American Institute of Architects reported today that the Architecture Billings Index (ABI), a gauge of the number of responding firms that with higher billings less those with lower billings in the prior month, fell to 48.7 in October from 50.4 in September, the first reading above the breakeven 50 mark since January 2008. Reed Construction Data reported on Tuesday that the value of nonresidential construction starts surged 30% in October from a “weak” September level but fell 9% short of the October 2009 mark. “Together, September-October starts were about at the monthly average for the 25 months since the September 2008 financial crisis,” said Chief Economist Jim Haughey.

An interesting article on what larger companies are doing in regards to social media. From Entrepreneur magazine. Click here to read the article — Social Media and the Fortune 500

 If you find yourself using Facebook to send out work-related emails to coworkers, you’re not alone.

According to a new report issued by Gartner (IT), 20% of business users will use social networks as their primary means of business communications by 2014. Gartner says it expects e-mail clients from Microsoft and IBM (IBM) will soon start integrating with social networking sites, giving users access to their e-mails, contacts and calendars from their favorite social networking platform. What’s more, Gartner says that contact lists, calendars and messaging clients on smartphones will all be capable of connecting with social networking platforms by 2012.

“The rigid distinction between e-mail and social networks will erode,” says Gartner analyst Monica Basso. “E-mail will take on my social attributes… while social networks will develop richer e-mail capabilities.”

Gartner also predicts that more of these social network-enabled e-mail clients will move away from on-premises networks and into the cloud. By the end of 2010, Gartner projects that 10% of corporate e-mail accounts will be in the cloud, up from 7% in 2009.

Good news for the Ohio economy  

The Ohio Department of Development (ODOD) awarded Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Sensors in Akron a $1 million grant for advanced materials development.  The grant will support Lockheed Martin’s effort to develop the next generation of lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicles for use in persistent surveillance, reconnaissance and communication applications. 

Key technology advancements are required in the materials area to ensure the durability and integrity of the LTA vehicle’s envelope, particularly the hull fabric.  This grant is specifically directed toward establishing commercial production of light-weight, flexible film materials in Ohio that will provide the high modulus and reduced permeability required for the LTA vehicles.  The superior and unique material properties will come from Ohio companies, working collaboratively with Lockheed Martin, as part of its local supply chain.  As the use of LTA vehicles continue to grow, the market for the fabric will increase and create additional jobs in the state.

The project team includes Lockheed Martin, Akron Polymer Systems (APS), Chemsultants International located in Mentor, Ohio, and the University of Akron (UA). Lockheed Martin will be the project lead and provide expertise in LTA technology. APS will provide its knowledge of condensation polymers. Chemsultants is a world leader in films and casting. UA includes experts in polymers and nanomaterials. Ohio’s Center for Multifunctional Polymer Nanomaterials and Devices (CMPND) has a long history with these organizations, building collaborative relationships, assisting with grant preparation and providing leadership.

The proximity of suppliers benefits Lockheed Martin in terms of speed and communications, while providing an additional 10 near-term jobs to the northwest Ohio economy.  Assuming the materials development and subsequent demonstration project is successful, Lockheed Martin’s LTA development team is expected to employ an additional 120 workers by 2013. Further, the project will preserve 80 jobs in Ohio and create expanded opportunities in the state for such advanced flexible composites markets as medical packaging and instruments, space structures and inflatable ground structures.

Both the technologies and collaborations involved in the project build on a history of support and cooperation developed in earlier efforts. More specifically, this proposal is clearly an extension of groundwork put in place by collaborations with CMPND and the ODOD Research Commercialized Program (RCP) Polyimide project support.

The Ohio Third Frontier Program that is funding this and other projects leverages private enterprise funds to create additional jobs for Ohioans.

 The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) President John Engler issued the following statement today on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) permitting guidance to account for greenhouse gas emissions starting January 2, 2011:
 
“While we are still in the process of reviewing the document, manufacturers remain very concerned with the EPA’s overreaching agenda, and today’s release of the greenhouse gas permitting guidance raises more questions than answers. The EPA continues to create uncertainty for manufacturers as we move closer to the January 2, 2011 deadline. While the agency has requested public comment, the short timeframe will hinder stakeholders’ ability to provide robust feedback.

It is also questionable whether the state agencies have the resources or the capacity to expeditiously issue new permits. Manufacturers cannot afford additional permitting delays that will hinder decision-making and certainty for their business.”

A pretty interesting article by Gerald Shankel, President and CEO, Fabricators & Manufacturers Association, International

Consider a manufacturing career amid media reports of shuttered factories, job losses and the worst economy since the Depression? Although certainly counter-intuitive, the answer to that question is a resounding yes! Despite the shaky economy, scores of American manufacturers are reporting a dire need for skilled labor.

Industry surveys reinforce this claim. According to the 2009 Manpower Talent Shortage Survey, among the most difficult jobs to fill in North America are those of the skilled manual trades, with electricians, carpenters/joiners and welders as the most in-demand employees.

In addition, an October 2009 report issued by the Manufacturing Institute, Deloitte and Oracle, cites that among companies involved in skilled production (whose employees are machinists, craft workers and technicians), 51 percent report shortages and see increased shortages ahead.

Although the United States has lost huge numbers of manufacturing jobs to countries like China, there still are well paying job opportunities for skilled workers in the manufacturing sector here. As more and more baby boomers retire, the problem is only expected to accelerate.

The looming skilled-worker shortage is an unwelcome threat to the nation’s manufacturing base that needs to be addressed at multiple levels, from better educating the next generation of factory workers to improving the public’s image of plant work.

You can read the rest of the article here — America’s Most Wanted: Skilled Workers

 (from a recent report by the Associated General Contractors of America)

Temporary Public-Sector Construction Spending Boosts Commercial Construction Employment, Offsetting Declines in Residential Construction, Association Officials Note

Even as the number of people working in construction increased by 5,000 between September and October 2010, the industry’s unemployment rate rose to 17.3 percent, according to an analysis of federal employment figures released today by the Associated General Contractors of America. Temporary government investments boosted commercial construction employment, offsetting further job losses in residential construction, association officials noted.

“Despite significant help from programs like the BRAC and the stimulus, construction employment continues to lag behind much of the private sector,” said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer. “It is yet another indicator that the economy has a long way to grow before demand for new office buildings, retail centers and manufacturing facilities returns.”

Association officials noted that construction employment lagged behind other sectors of the economy. For example, while total private employment rose by 1.1 million during the past 12 months, the construction industry lost 122,000 jobs. Meanwhile, the industry’s unemployment rate is nearly double the unadjusted national rate of 9.5 percent.

Nonresidential construction fared relatively well in October compared to residential construction, association officials said. Nonresidential construction employment added 10,300 jobs since September, while residential construction lost 5,800 jobs. Nonresidential specialty construction added 7,300 jobs and heavy & civil engineering added 4,800 jobs. However, nonresidential building construction employment declined by 1,800 jobs between September and October.

The employment data is consistent with construction spending figures released earlier this week that showed increases in public construction spending offsetting continued declines in private-sector construction. Temporary federal programs like the stimulus and base realignment efforts were driving demand for construction workers from the specialty trades and heavy & civil engineering construction sectors. Meanwhile decreased private-sector activity contributed to the nonresidential building job losses.

While the stimulus has helped protect the construction industry from more severe job losses, construction firms were unlikely to significantly expand payrolls until the long-term market outlook improves, association officials said. They urged Washington officials to act on long-delayed water and transportation infrastructure programs and to provide the tax and regulatory relief needed to boost private sector economic activity.

“These modest job gains are likely to be as temporary as the programs that are driving them,” said Sandherr. “What this industry needs now is the certainty that comes with consistent tax, regulatory and federal infrastructure policies and the opportunity that comes from sustained and robust private sector economic growth.”